Just out: a brand new InvestRight Guide to Investing—this one focused on empowering you as an investor. How to be an Empowered Investor aims to simplify the way you think about investing and how you engage with both your advisor and your investments.

Sure, there are lots of ins-and-outs to investing. It’s easy to trip over—or more often to skip over—ideas and information you don’t understand. Even experienced investors can overlook the most basic steps and concepts, sometimes to their detriment.

The brass tacks we’re talking about are a combination of attitude and information that will lead you where you need to go to be an empowered investor. Know and do the five simple things below and you’ll be well on your way.

  1. Be skeptical!
  2. Know that higher returns = higher risk. There are no exceptions.
  3. Always conduct your due diligence.
  4. Ask about the fees you pay and what your advisor earns from your business.
  5. Know the warning signs of investment fraud and speak up when you see or suspect it.

The new guide comes with a series of worksheets that set out the questions you need to ask of yourself, your advisor, and your investments. You can print them out and fill them in, or use the interactive worksheets posted on the InvestRight site.

Either way, taking the time to complete the worksheets and read the guide can’t help but improve your investment literacy. And that will help you to make the most of your investments.

Suggested Reading

IFRS Part 2: Changes in Financial Statement Terminology

Your Guide to Crypto-assets

Investment Caution List: Five New Additions

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